Home Discussion Forum Cover Crops Interseeding: cover crop species vs herbicide interactions

This topic contains 8 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of Erica Olson Erica Olson 2 years, 2 months ago.

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  • #826
    Profile photo of Kevan Klingberg
    Kevan Klingberg
    Participant

    Interseeding cover crops into corn that is already growing is an interest that farmers, soil conservationists, and soil health advocates all have. One of the questions that always comes up is ” how will that work, considering the herbicides I use for corn production? ” This is a legitimate question whether you wonder about using a drill, or broadcasting from a spreader. One of the best resources that addresses cover crop species vs herbicide interactions is a Penn State publication called “Improving the success of interseeding cover crops in corn” by W. Curran & G. Roth (May 2015). See link below – Download and save the pdf, it is good.

    http://extension.psu.edu/plants/crops/soil-management/cover-crops/interseeder-applicator/improving-the-success-of-interseeding-cover-crops-in-corn

  • #860
    Profile photo of Tom Novak
    Tom Novak
    Participant

    It will be interesting to see how often we can make this practice work in WI.  I have one client with 3 years of experimenting under his belt.  Last year was the first time he had any significant areas in fields that has cover crop growth after harvest.

    Observations over the first 2 years led us to determining the failures are due to lack of light.  We may have good establishment and cover presence into August, but somewhere in there the crop runs out of gas.  Thin crop areas on headlands or within field see good cover establishment.  Otherwise near zero success.

    Early planting may be the key.  This year Verdict will go on at corn planting time in that 9 oz/a rate, glyphosate on June 1 and begin seeding covers right @V4 stage.  Stay tuned for success assessment.

     

  • #876
    Profile photo of Amber Radatz
    Amber Radatz
    Participant

    Discovery Farms tried a field with interseeding in 2016 and it was pretty much a failure. Everything got up and growing but died out before the crop was harvested. It was on an organic field so herbicide wasn’t the issue this time. What species are you planning on, Tom?

  • #881
    Profile photo of Tom Novak
    Tom Novak
    Participant

    Annual Ryegrass is the base and different clovers have been tried along with rape/radish/turnips.  I think the key will be to get them in as early as possible like I said.  Really need to start seeding at V4 and be done by late V5.  Got about a week to get it done.  It seems the plants don’t have enough roots down and energy to survive into early Oct when the canopy allows light in.  I know a few guys are making this work to some degree but I don’t hold out a lot of hope.  It is the only way to get multi species in a corn soy rotation – early or maybe in Sept?

  • #936
    Profile photo of Kevan Klingberg
    Kevan Klingberg
    Participant

    These pics are from July 11 (18 days after planting).  I was so excited to see this.  Then, within the next couple weeks it all went away.  Planting was a bit late at V6, maybe even 7.  Shown are crimson clover, radish and winter rye.

    2016_Jul 11_Interseed 18DAP crim clov b2016_Jul 11_Interseed 18DAP rad e2016_Jul 11_Interseed 18DAP w rye e

  • #938
    Profile photo of Tom Novak
    Tom Novak
    Participant

    It is frustrating because I’ve seen the same you have – usually most of hangs in there till sometime in August but not much if any at harvest.  The ones that brag about good success really makes me wonder what’s different.   Matt Ruark has interesting work started with red clover so I’m excited to see more of his trials.

  • #945
    Profile photo of Dave Olson
    Dave Olson
    Participant

    Is there a shade tolerant variety of plant that would work best for interseeding since shade seems to be the limiting factor?

     

     

     

  • #1029
    Profile photo of Andy Bensend
    Andy Bensend
    Participant

    Our Watershed group has plans to seed several species this week into standing corn.   We will try to seed into corn from V4 up to V7 and several different soil types and several different herbicide programs in an effort to look for the strongest impact factors.   Our planned species include clovers, cereals, rape, peas, sunhemp, and several other species.   I will try to document what we do and share.   We will be using a cultivator with a Gandy  air seeder attached.

  • #1032
    Profile photo of Erica Olson
    Erica Olson
    Keymaster

    Keep us posted on how the Farmers of Barron County Watersheds cover crop trials establish, great learning opportunity! Are they all being planted into corn silage fields?

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